Premier Equestrian Dressage
Dressage Horse Arena Footing Horse Jumps Barn & Stable Horse & Rider Books/DVD's/Gifts

made in america
Warranty • Shipping

We ship to Canada

© Premier Equestrian 2013

Home > Footing > Footing Solutions and Sand Specifications

See also:
ProStride Rubber Arena Footing  GGT Textile Arena Footing  ProTex Rubber/Textile Arena Footing ProTex Plus Footing
Athletex Arena Footing    Master's Blend Footing    Premier Arena Hydro-Keep

  • Footing Solutions
  • Sand Specifications


The Perfect Arena Footing...does it exist?

We hear a lot of debate about the perfect arena surface and footing material. Every few years- new footings come around claiming to be "it". But if the perfect footing does exist then why are the products continually changing? We have done our share of research over many years and in many different arenas. While there are many opinions involved they are more about personal preference, riding disciplines, breed, and climate than about actual footing material, sand, and installation.

Yes, the perfect arena footing does exist.
A "perfect" arena surface should be cushioned to minimize concussion on horse legs, firm enough to provide traction, not too slick, dust free, retain moisture and not overly abrasive to horse hooves. The arena surface should be resistant to freezing during cold weather, inexpensive to obtain and easy to maintain. A good example of an ideal surface would be sod. However the sod must contain the proper amount of moisture, maximum root depth with the grass blades spaced evenly. Sod allows the horse hoof to indent on impact offering cushioning, yet when the hoof pushes off, the sod provides a firm resistance to propel his gait or jump. Unfortunately sod will not hold up in a small area, so unless you have many acres, sod is not going to be the "perfect" option.

It's all relative.
The primary principle of selecting footing is to choose materials that maintain their loose nature without compacting while still providing stability and traction for riding. The major component of most footing is a mixture of sand, silt, and clay particles. The range of these particle sizes is the first key component. Materials with particles that are all the same size cannot compact, while materials consisting of different particle sizes causes the smallest particles fill the gaps and promotes compaction..

Not-So-Sharp.
Aggregate particle shape is another key component. Sharply angular materials (like manufactured sand or stone dust) are more prone to compaction than sub-angular particles. Sub-angular particles have already had the sharpest corners broken off so they do not fit as tightly together as sharp angular materials. Sub-angular particles will be relatively stable because they can nest together without rolling, and will resist compaction as the rounded edges have voids between them. Particles need some angularity to offer resistance to movement.

On a roll.
Round particles (such as river or beach sand) create more voids and resist compaction, but because they are round they have poor stability causing the sand to roll and shift. Beach and river sand have rounded particles; the wear of water action has removed most angular corners. Round sands have more stability when moisture is added.

Footing Additives. What are they for?
Footing additives, like Premier Equestrian ProStride, GGT Arena Footing, ProTex and Hyrdo-Keep, can help stabilize, maintain moisture, and add cushioning to your footing which greatly improves your riding surface.

So... the Perfect Arena Footing?
Arena depth and surface performance is determined by many factors; material, additives and particle sizes, how compactable the material is, and at what depth it is set. Footing that is too deep can cause soft tissue injuries i.e. tendons, stifles, and suspensory problems. It can also negatively impact your horses cardiovascular system and cause undue fatigue. Arena footing that is too hard can cause contusions. The perfect arena utilizes the best available materials to minimize these issues.

Determining if arena is too deep or too hard. The indentation that the hoof prints makes should be between 1/2" - 1'. Photo 1 Illustrates a surface that is too deep, indentation is 2.5".

Footing too deep

Too deep or loose arena surface; For deep footing start by removing some of the sand. If sand is made up of round particles this will also have the same effect as too deep of footing, causing shear and loss of traction for the hoof. Solutions for this type of footing would be GGT Textile or ProTex. Both products will stabilize the surface, bind the sand together as well as aid in moisture retention and dust control. ProTex will add an additional layer of cushioning with the added rubber particles. See Photo below showing same surface after removing sand and adding ProTex Arena Footing.

ProTex Equine Arena Footing rubber/textile blend

Compacted hard surfaces. Stone dust and sharp angulated sands that have compacted will benefit greatly by adding ProStride rubber arena footing. The rubber crumb will mix with the sharp angulated particles and create a void, thus providing cushioning and keep the surface from compacting.

ProStride Equine Arena Footing

Dusty Sand; Footing that possesses sub-angular particles and small fines, can easily become dusty. This type of footing will benefit by adding Premier Equestrian Hydro-Keep, a safe, non-toxic chemical crystal that rapidly absorbs and retains water. As the soil dries out, the water in the Hydro-Keep is gradually released, rehydrating the surrounding area. Our research shows it can also reduce your arena watering by 50%. The Hydro-Keep expands when watered and then contracts as the water is released over time. An added benefit provides additional cushion and reduces compaction.

Round, shifty sand; Sand that is round and therefore not very stable can benefit from adding GGT Textile. This new European additive now made in the US, will absorb small fines bind the sand particles together adding stability while reducing dust.GGT Textile mixed in the sand enhances traction and reduces shear. Shear is the twisting motion of the horse's hoof and hock in an unstable surface.

Sand quality and specifications

Why is the right sand so important?

Sand is the foundation of every good footing. However not every sand is suitable for riding arenas. When installing a new arena surface, the question arises if you really save money by choosing cheaper sand. The right sand is certainly a good investment and we are happy to consult with you. There are an enormous variety of sand qualities out there. The combination of all these sand quality factors decides whether the sand is suitable as footing or not. Sand that is well suited for an indoor riding arena might be completely unsuitable for an all-weather outdoor riding arena. Choosing the wrong sand can create a lot of problems and in the long run can be very expensive.
Sand impacts the condition of the surface. If the surface is hard, the horse will shorten its stride to minimize jarring and modify his jumping form to avoid the sting of landing. Hard footing will also stress his joints. If it's too soft, it will cause strain to his soft tissues - tendons, ligaments and muscles. If the footing is slippery, the horse will feel insecure, and so he horse will move cautiously.
Good footing is safer for your horse and boosts his confidence.
Sand Specification Booklet for Equestrian Arena Footing
click to download / view our booklet

Defining Sand

First let's define sand. There is a huge spectrum of different types of sand. Knowing their characteristics can help you decide if the sand you choose will be suitable as a riding surface.
Sand is the general term for broken down granules of minerals or rocks. Technically, particles that fall between one-sixteenth of a millimeter to two millimeters in diameter are referred to as Sand. Sand is smaller than Gravel, but larger than silt or clay.
Sand is defined by its size rather than what type of mineral it is. Particle size or grain size refers to the diameter of a grain of granular material. To determine a sand granule size, a sample is vibrated through a set of sieves of known mesh sizes. For sand the mesh size of the sieve can range from a No. 10 sieve which is 2 mm to a No. 200 sieve which is .075 mm mesh size.

Choosing the correct sand for your arena.

Sand is a common ingredient in many arena surfaces and ranges from very fine sand .075mm to very coarse 2.00 mm. Sand alone may be used but it is often combined with other particle sizes and other materials. Adding the proper depth of sand is a key factor. Too deep of sand can cause stress and injuries. Not only is the depth a factor in how the sand performs, but particle shape and size plays an important role as well. Newly laid sand contains air pockets that absorb shock and rebounds. However, sand will erode, breakdown forming dust particles, and compact into an unsuitable surface over time.
Sand Qualities
Most sand producers will have a technical data sheet available for the types of sand they sell. This technical data sheet will have a passing column showing the size of sand that passed through that particular sieve. Some sheets will also show what percentage was retained. Understanding this information will help you to determine what type or size of sand you will want for your arena footing. The company selling the sand will be able to help you read this information. Click here to view sample information sheet.

UNDERSTANDING ARENA FOOTING - BASIC FACTS:

Poor footing issues: If the arena footing is hard, the horse will shorten its stride to minimize jarring or adversely modify his jumping form to avoid the sting of landing. Hard footing will also stress his joints. If footing is too soft and rolls away under the hooves, it will cause strain to his soft tissues - tendon, ligaments, and muscles. If the footing is slippery, or insufficient so that the hooves penetrate to a slippery base, the horse may fall or feel insecure and move cautiously.
Good footing is safer for your horse and boosts his confidence and performance.
Footing Properties

FOOTING PROPERTIES:

When you walk on a beach, the dry sand above the high tide mark has no traction, rolls away underfoot and is tiring to even walk over. The damp sand in the middle feels cushiony, yet is supportive with good traction, while the wet compacted sand at the wave line can actually feel hard with minimal give underfoot.
With arena footing, we strive for that happy medium of cushion and traction to help our horses perform their best and stay sound.

Rolling vs Stablized Footing: There are several factors that affect footing particle stabilization:

Particle shape: The shape of the footing particles affects stability underfoot - whether the footing will roll (round particles), compact and become hard (sharp particles) or provide cushion and stability (angular particles). Angular particles offer some resistance to movement between them, preventing rolling, but permit enough give for a cushioning effect.

Particle size: Footing that contains particles very close in size and that have been washed of all fines, silt and clay will be less stable and more likely to roll under hooves than footing with a moderate range of particle size. Extremely washed cleaned sand can cause a rolling effect.

Watering: An intermolecular attraction is formed between water molecules that acts to hold wet sand together and can help stabilize rounded sand footing that would otherwise roll if dry.
*Fines including clay, silt and organic matter will hold moisture for longer period of time, however these fines will become dust when completely dry out.

Hard vs Cushiony Footing:

Each discipline has its' own requirements for the amount of give and rebound that enhances optimal performance. The firmer footing with good traction that helps jumpers to safely push off may not have enough cushion to preserve the joints of an aging dressage horse, while arenas needing all-around capabilities cannot be specialized to either extreme. Understanding the needs of the arena users will help you make the proper selections in sand and additives.

ABOUT SAND

Sand Types:
Natural Sand:
Natural sand has eroded from mountain rock and is mined from where it was deposited. The host rock determines the exact mineral composition, however most sand is composed of silica, from broken down quartz crystals. This type of sand is extremely resistant to weathering and breakdown due to its chemical hardness, and will last longer as arena footing. These hard sand particles have been transported and tumbled by water, and the time spent tumbling determines an angular or round grain shape.

Manufactured Sand: Rock quarries crush rock into various sizes, and the smallest particles are called 'fines' and sold as Manufactured Sand, Man-made Sand, Crusher Fines, or Stone Dust. These particles range from 5 mm to fine dust, are sharp and will tightly compact if used alone. The mineral composition can range widely, and these particles are not the hard "surviving" quartz grains of tumbling river action, so they may be softer and break down to dust sooner.

Sand Shape:

The next characteristic of sand is its shape:
Crusher Fines or Man-Made Sands will have very sharp tendencies. Sharp, very angular materials are prone to fit tightly together and compact, but do offer good traction. A small amount of manufactured sand can be useful to add stabilization to rolling footing with very round sand grains. ProStride Arena Footing is a good solution for these type of sands. The rubber will help cushion the surface and add voids and lesson the compaction.

Natural Sands will have sub-angular to rounded grains, because the sharp edges have been worn off, so they don't fit as tightly together. Sub - angular grains lessen compaction while still giving traction. Round grained sand will not compact because all the edges have been worn off. Although round particles create more voids and therefore offer more cushioning, they are very unstable and will roll and not provide any traction. So, when selecting natural sand, you need to collect samples from different sources and look at the sand grains with a strong magnifying lens to compare the general particle shape, and then select the most angular.
Angular Sand Particles Subangular Sand Particles Round Sand Particles
Angular Sub-Angular Round

Sand Sizes:

Sand is defined by its size rather than what type of mineral it is. Particle size or grain size refers to the diameter of a grain of granular material. Technically, particles that fall between one-sixteenth of a millimeter to two millimeters in diameter are referred to as Sand. To determine a sand granule size, a sample is vibrated through a set of sieves of known mesh sizes to give the percentage that passes each numbered sieve. Most sand producers will have a technical data sheet available for the types of sand they sell. This technical data sheet will have a passing column showing the size of sand that passed through each particular sieve. The majority (90%) of grain sizes will be in the range of the sieve sizes referenced here for each sand type, with a very small fraction larger or smaller. Having this information will help you to determine what type or size of sand you will want for your arena footing. The company selling the sand will be able to help you read their data sheets.

Sand Qualities Concrete Sand Sheet
The photos below illustrate Fines, Masonry and Concrete Sand. Please keep in mind every quarry across the country will have different names and types of sand. Be sure to use the specifications and sizes to determine what sand you will need and not the local names. Although 'Concrete Sand' and 'Masonry Sand'are fairly standard specifications as to grain size, 'Arena Sand' could mean anything.

Pit Run: Sand excavated and sold "as is" without grading or washing, is called pit run. It will have a wide variation from large grains to dust fines and the properties are determined by the sand deposit, which may vary within the quarry.
3sandstype

Fines.

Fines, clay and silt, can be very small and easily become airborne and promote dust. The size of the fines in the photo above are between .075mm (#200 sieve) and smaller. If your arena consists mostly of fines and you have water available, our GGT Textile footing can help absorb the fines and net the footing together, greatly decreasing dust and loose particles that can be such an annoyance, and even a health hazard.

Fine Silica Sand: Very pure, fine sand with particles between #60 sieve and #200 seive (or 60/200). Silica sand has sub-angular particles and is highly desirable for use with textile footing additives, like GGT Footing. It is not widely available, however, and may be expensive or hard to find in your area.
Fines, cyclone type sand

Masonry Sand.

This particle shape can vary from round to sub-angular, depending on the deposit and processing. Particle size for Masonry Sand is between 0.60 mm (#30 sieve) to 0.15mm (#100 sieve) (or 30/100). Masonry sand is a standardized size specification and is washed free of dust. GGT Textile and ProTex work very well for this type of sand, helping to stabilize the rounder particle and netting the sand together for more traction.
Masonry Sand

Concrete Sand.

Concrete sand is usually angular to sub-angular in shape. The particle size varies between 2.0mm (#10 sieve) - .3mm (#50 sieve) (or 10/50). Concrete Sand is a standardized size specification and is washed free of dust. If you are not able to water your arena, Concrete Sand will help minimize dust, and a good angulation of the grains will help keep it stable underfoot. ProStride and ProTex arena footing will help keep these types of sands from compacting, creating voids and adding cushioning to the surface, while preventing rolling underfoot.
With Masonry and Concrete sand, if a sand screw is used to filter particles, rather than washing through screens, to process the sand you are more likely to have good particle angulation. This is a question to ask the sand supplier.
Concrete Sand

Washed Sands:

Getting a sand that is washed of all fines, will not be as stable of a surface as a sand that contains some fines (under #200 mesh or sieve size). A washed sand will have less dust, however a washed sand will have less traction, less compaction and more shear. Be careful when choosing washed sands. If you have water available an unwashed sand may be a better option. Be sure that the particles that falls below a #200 sieve do not exceed 15% or dust may be an issue.

Sand Grading:

Another key element causing your sand to compact or stay loose is how well it is graded. Grading is a combination of a range of different sized particles. Materials that have all the same size particles will not compact, and may become shifty and feel deep, whereas particles that range from large to very small granules will nest and compact. A happy medium of a moderate range of sand size grading will help keep your footing firm but not compacted. Important: The sieve size range to look for will depend on what type of additive you are adding or if it is a sand only arena.

There are an enormous variety of sand qualities out there. The combination of all the above sand quality factors decides whether the sand is suitable as footing or not. Sand that is well suited for a highly maintained indoor riding arena might be completely unsuitable for an all-weather, low maintenance outdoor riding arena. Choosing the wrong sand can create a lot of problems and in the long run can be very expensive.
Unfortunately you are somewhat limited to using a material that is located in your area, as trucking sand in from long distances can be extremely costly. So we usually settle for what is available to us locally. Your contractor or supplier will be able to assist you with the different types of material located in your area. This is where footing additives can help solve many of the dilemmas associated with local sand.

Properties of Footing Additives:

ProStride TM Horse Arena Footing; is a crumb-rubber horse arena footing formulated to exacting specifications. Designed to mix with sand. Several more recycling processes results in a cleaner, more consistent material. No dust, no metal, no fibers. Your arena riding surface is greatly improved, minimizing leg concussion and protecting your horse's tendons and joints. Helps prevent injury and improve your horse's performance.

Properties of Footing Additives:

ProStride TM Arena Footing Works very well to bridge between rounded sand grains to counteract rolling and provide more cushioning and rebound. Rubber prolongs sand life by minimizing sand grain breakdown. It also will lessen compacting and provide cushioning in arenas with stone dust, or manufactured sand. In dry sand, rubber crumb will sift itself up or down relative to the size of the sand grains, much like a box of cornflakes sifts itself with the large flakes on top, grading to the fines at the bottom of the box. To make sure the rubber particles stay down in the footing where they can do their job, you need either: A) rubber particle sizes that are close to your sand particle sizes or B) some added water and frequent harrowing to remix the footing. Therefore, ProStride TM works best with the larger particles of Concrete Sand or manufactured sands. Look for sand particle size between a No.10 sieve and a No. 50 sieve.
Note:
All our footings are designed to be mixed with sand. There are, however, significant varieties in sand types and qualities available on the market. Not all sands are appropriate to use as footing for your equestrian arena. There are many factors you should consider in determining the appropriate sand, including, without limitation, your riding style, the number of horses using the arena and the duration of such arena use, watering capability for the ring, the status of any current existing footing materials, seasonal weather conditions, and whether you ride on an indoor or outdoor horse arena. Combining GGT- Footing, ProStride, and ProTex with the correct type of sand is required in order to build a safe ring surface. Please choose properly sized arena sand based on your proposed use. Mixing and installation is the responsibility of the customer. Premier Equestrian is not liable for your installation. However we can make recommendations and have your sand analysed to qualify it's integrity. If you have concerns about mixing and installation we can recommend a qualified arena builder.

GGT-Footing, ProTex and ProTex Plus Non-Woven Textiles:

This type of footing additive is referred to as an on top footing. Textiles will minimizes compaction, while stabilizing sand particles, and deliver cushioning and energy rebound. Best with finer grained sand, which is small enough to be pounded into the textile fiber with hoof impact, helping to integrate the sand and textile to form a matrix with good shear resistance. Textiles absorb water for longer moisture retention, reducing watering frequency. Important: Sufficient moisture to keep footing damp is necessary with textile additives, as textiles will sift to the surface if footing becomes totally dry. However, since the textile holds moisture longer than sand, textiles will reduce watering.

Renew old broken down arena surfaces with GGT-Footing, ProTex or ProTex Plus :

These products will stabilize broken down or loose surfaces, bind the sand together as well as aid in moisture retention and dust control. These Textile products will help bind old broken down dusty surfaces, and create a more level top coat. Great for a base that is uneven or non-existent. The textile will help absorb dust fines as well as bond the sand particles together creating a matrix, stabilizing your sand. Horse hooves will stay on the top of the surface. The textiles prevent the hoof from penetrating through the footing surface to the base, therefore creating a level top surface to camouflage an inadequate base.
Water is an important factor in maintaining and mixing the GGT-Footing and ProTex products. A professional grade arena groomer is also a key factor in maintaining this textured surface. See the Parma arena groomer for best results.
Parma Arena Groomer

Sand Specifications for GGT Footing, ProTex and ProTex Plus:

The type of sand used for textiles should be a fine well graded silica or quartz sand. Particle size should range between a No. 60 sieve and No. 200 sieve, with 5% - 10% of the sand falling below the #200. Use an unwashed or slightly washed silica sand. See range chart below for acceptable sand particle sizes that will work with our textile products.

Additional additives that may help reduce watering and dust. Hydro-Keep:

Non-toxic concentrated chemical crystal that rapidly absorbs excess water, and releases it back into the footing over time, with expanding and contracting action that helps to reduce footing compaction. Reduces watering frequency; optimum effects are achieved with infrequent, but heavy water applications. The life expectancy for an outdoor arena is less, as the polymer will break down in sunlight.

Magnesium Chloride (MgCl):

Non-toxic chemical compound with Hygroscopic action (absorbs moisture out of the surrounding air) to keep footing damp without watering (in locations with sufficiently high atmospheric humidity), or to prolong arena watering (in locations with low humidity). Very useful to keep footing in unheated indoor arenas from freezing in winter, and mirrors from icing. Not recommended for outdoor arenas- will prevent arenas from drying after heavy precipitation.

Get test strip of GGT-Footing Get a footing test strip

Choosing the best combination of sand and Premier Equestrian Footing Products for your arena. To help narrow down the range of footing choices, it is best to select according to your situation regarding available sand material, maintenance level, watering, and humidity conditions, then refine choices according to your riding discipline(s). A professional type of grooming equipment is recommended for textured footing. See the Parma arena groomer for best results. Check our website for the best groomers available.

OUTDOOR ARENA:

Highly maintenance, with frequent harrowing and regular watering (so the footing remains damp): Suggested depth 2.5" - 3" of sand
A. Silica sand (see acceptable ranges of sand chart) mix with GGT-Footing, or ProTex Arena Footing
B. Sand/Clay silt mix with GGT-Footing or ProTex Arena Footing
C. Concrete Sand, Stone Dust or manufactured sand and ProStride Arena Footing
D. Stone Dust/ Sand mixed with ProTex Arena Footing
Lower maintenance, with little or no watering and weekly harrowing:
A. Concrete Sand, of the most angular particles you can find, slighty washed combined with ProStride Arena Footing.

INDOOR ARENA:

Highly Maintaintenance, with frequent harrowing and regular watering (so that the footing remains damp): Suggested depth 2.5" - 3" of sand
A. Silica sand (see acceptable ranges of sand chart) mix with GGT-Footing, or ProTex Arena Footing
B. Sand/Clay silt mix with GGT-Footing or ProTex Arena Footing
C. Existing broken down sand with dust and fine particles Mix with GGT-Footing, ProTex or ProTex Plus for the sands above
D. Concrete Sand, Stone Dust or Manufactured Sand, unwashed or slightly washed. Mixed with ProStride

Lower Maintenance, with infrequent deep watering and harrowing as needed:
A. Silica sand (see acceptable ranges of sand chart) mix with ProTex Arena Footing plus Hydro-Keep Arena Hydrator or MagCl.
B. Concrete Sand, Stone Dust or Manufactured Sand, mix withProStride Arena Footing and Hydro-Keep or MagCl.
C. Concrete Sand, ProStride Arena footing, MagCl (If minimal water)

NEW CONSTRUCTION ARENAS:

Building a professional base is always best. However, this can be very expensive and in today's economy not always possible. If you have the funds to build a professional base, you will have more options for what types of footing you can use, and your arena will perform much better over a long period of time. Again, you may be limited to what sands and aggregates are available in your area. To determine what type of footing you will want on the top layer, get different samples from your local pits or quarries. See the suggestions above for the different sand types and footing additives.

TROUBLESHOOTING EXISTING ARENAS:

If your base is not perfect or your footing is a problem, here are some suggestions to help improve your riding surface:

Silt fines or Sugar Sand:

If you are in an area of naturally fine sandy ground, outdoor arenas can become deep with use. If your arena consists mostly of fines, and you have water available, our GGT-footing and ProTex can help absorb the fines and knit the footing together creating a matrix and level surface, greatly decreasing dust and loose particles that can be such an annoyance, and even a health hazard.

Rolling Sand:

If you have water available , ProTex (for more coarse sand) or GGT-Footing (for fine sand) will help give traction underfoot. Adding some fines may also help stabilization. If you do not have any water available, Adding ProStride 25%to 30% (by depth) will help minimize rolling in dry sand. (Removed some of the depth is recommended). For finer sand, you will need more frequent harrowing to keep the ProStride rubber mixed in than with coarse sand.

Dusty Clay base arenas:

GGT-Footing integrates as well with fine clay particles as with fine sand particles. Since clay retains moisture easily, adding GGT-Footing may work well with less added water than needed for sand. If plenty of natural rain is the problem or a clay arena is slippery, ProTex Arena footing, harrowed in, will add traction and cushioning with the rubber particles, while binding the clay particles to the textile while stabilizing the suface and eliminating shear.

Dust and Freezing footing in unheated indoor arenas:

Many of the additives that improve footing require moisture. If your indoor arena is unheated, our MagCl is safe to add to all our footing products to keep your footing moist and unfrozen. As an added benefit, MagCl will draw moisture out of the air, preventing mirrors from icing in winter and reducing humidity in the air so it feels warmer. In areas of high winter humidity, the moisture that MagCl draws out of the air and into the footing may help prevent dust where watering is minimal or not possible.

Please contact our sales team for any questions you might have concerning your arena footing surface. Premier Equestrian is dedicated to promoting safe and enjoyable riding for you and your horse.
To have your sand professionally tested and analyzed please contact www.amec.com to find an office near you.
Amec is one of the world's leading environmental and engineering consulting organizations. Their full service capabilities cover a wide range of disciplines, including environmental engineering and science, geotechnical engineering, water resources, materials testing, engineering and surveying, and program management.

To determine which footing amendment is right for your existing sand you may also send us a small sand sample to:

Premier Equestrian
8385 South Allen St.
Suite. 101
Sandy, UT 84070

Be sure to include your name and phone number with the sample and what discipline you ride.

Copyright 2011 Premier Equestrian, LLC All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any way or by any means without the permission in writing from Premier Equestrian, LLC.

General
*Premier Equestrian offers footing amendments and we can guide you to find a footing solution that will work for you and your budget, enabling you to have a great footing for a fraction of the cost of competing products or arena builders. However, choosing the correct sand and particle size is your responsibility and results may vary depending on what is available in your area and the quality of your installation. Premier Equestrian is not responsible or liable for your installation.
PREMIER EQUESTRIAN DOES NOT MAKE ANY WARRANTIES OR REPRESENTATIONS OF ANY KIND, WHETHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, WITH RESPECT TO ANY SERVICE OR PRODUCT, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, WARRANTIES OR REPRESENTATIONS CONCERNING MERCHANTABILITY, NONINFRINGEMENT, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, PERFORMANCE, QUALITY, OR THAT PRODUCTS OR SERVICES WILL BE ERROR-FREE.